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Category: Good Reads

Charlotte Rampling by Paolo Roversi for Interview Magazine

Charlotte Rampling by Paolo Roversi 1 Charlotte Rampling by Paolo Roversi 1

Interview Magazine: Charlotte Rampling


I felt very special in Paris, more special than I felt in London. I love London for different reasons. I've always been close to London, being English. But somehow there's something special about living as an Englishwoman in Paris.

Good Reads | Jonathan Van Meter

Jonathan Van Meter

BoF: Jonathan Van Meter and the Age of Celebrity



“I remember one time being in a meeting,” he recalls, “and it was always important to put a number on the cover, something like ‘600 Day Looks for Fall.’ Someone said, ‘We counted all of the looks and there aren’t 600 looks!’ and Anna said, ‘Did you count every pair of shoes?’

‘Yes, we did,’ came the reply.

‘Well did you count every bracelet?’ she countered.

‘Is a bracelet a look?’

And, in a way that only she could, Anna says: ‘Yes, a bracelet is a look.’”

Maja Salamon & Ysaunny Brito by Paolo Roversi for W September 2014

Maja Salamon & Ysaunny Brito by Paolo Roversi for W September 2014 1 Maja Salamon & Ysaunny Brito by Paolo Roversi for W September 2014 1
W Magazine: Saving Grace


Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli are reinventing Valentino’s legendary elegance for the next generation. Meet the keepers of the flame as they open the new Valentino flagship in New York.

Good Reads | Alessandro Dell’Acqua

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W: Alessandro Dell’Acqua: A Man For All Seasons


Five years after losing his namesake 
label, the designer has a new 
gig at Rochas and a line of his own.

Good Reads | Natalie Massenet

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032c: Net-A-Porter’s NATALIE MASSENET: “I wanted to call my website What’s New, Pussycat?”



Fifteen years later, Massenet has just launched Porter magazine, the first 100-percent shoppable print publication. “People always say to me, ‘You’ve really strived to redefine retail.’ But the reality is I wanted to redefine magazines.” It’s been called the biggest launch in British fashion publishing for years, and it may well represent a new synthesis of retail and media. “We’re building a physical temple to our brand – 
like Apple did with stores,” Massenet explains. 
Her competitors are boiling, so she must be doing something right.

Good Reads | Inside Prada’s Dream Factory

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NY Magazine: Step Inside Prada’s Dream Factory With Patrizio Bertelli, Miuccia’s Partner in All Things


But what we essentially mean by artisan is a top-quality product—it’s not necessarily handmade, but it’s made via processes that have a long history.”

★ Yep

WWD: Fashion Advertising: Controversy — Where Has It Gone?



Controversy09Outrageous, edgy fashion ads that get everybody talking. Where did they go?

Gone are the scandalous days of Calvin’s rippling abs and come-hither youth; Abercrombie’s S&M Santa; the full-frontal Saint Laurent; Benetton’s kissing clergy, and Jenny McCarthy doing her business on Candie’s toilet.

It wasn’t controversy that killed them. On the contrary, such controversy successfully put these and other brands squarely into the limelight, for better or worse.

But after shifts from the shocking and sexually suggestive to the socially conscious and lifestyle aspirational, the fashion industry has entered a new state: tame.

Blame it on the media. With so much corporate emphasis on having the right social campaign, Instagram, Twitter feeds, videos, Web sites and the goal of accumulating “likes” on Facebook, not to mention global, cross-cultural sensitivities, the edge that cuts through the advertising clutter has been dulled.

To be sure, there’s no shortage of talented photographers who take beautiful pictures, but some observers argue that intensely image-conscious companies, public or otherwise, are so intent on controlling how they’re perceived, advertising has simply become too safe. And safe equates with boring.

Stoya by Molly Matalon for DIS Magazine

Stoya by Molly Matalon for DIS Magazine

DIS Magazine:



Ada: Are there any porn films you would call art?

Stoya: Nowadays,  the production and release schedule for films  is so fast that there’s usually not much room to be creative. A porn film that definitely transcends the genre is Café Flesh, an incredible  adult film from the ‘80s. The plot is basically a metaphor for porn, and the film is so centered around the theme of pornography; it folds onto itself and becomes art almost by accident.

Good Reads | Gareth Pugh

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Dazed: Gareth Pugh's Labyrinth


Fashion's dark provocateur is hitting the reset button. He opens up about his virtual reality experiments and attraction to opposite forces

Good Reads | Issey Miyake

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Fast Company: How Fashion Legend Issey Miyake Stays Creative


Japanese designer Issey Miyake retired many years ago from catwalk shows and seasonal collections, leaving a team of disciples to take care of the clothes. But Miyake, who is as famous for engineering the perfect pleat as he is for producing Steve Jobs’s signature black turtlenecks, remains startlingly creative. Since handing over runway duties in 1999 to Naoki Takizawa (and now Yoshiyuki Miyamae), he has designed everything from collapsible lamps to living room chairs.

Good Reads | Alasdair McLellan

Business of Fashion:



BoF talks to photographer Alasdair McLellan about his personal and professional path, from DJing and taking pictures of friends in the South Yorkshire village where he grew up to shooting covers for Vogue.

Good Reads | Nicolas Ouchenir

BoF: The Creative Class | Nicolas Ouchenir, Calligrapher



Nicolas OuchenirNicolas Ouchenir set up his calligraphy practise eleven years ago in a former Parisian butchery. Today, the charming man of letters creates some of the most coveted invitations in the world for leading fashion and luxury brands.

...

Ouchenir is the go-to calligrapher for a list of clients that reads like a who’s who of the fashion industry: Louis Vuitton, Hermès, Christian Dior, Gucci, Miu Miu, Chloé and Cartier are among the brands that regularly commission Ouchenir to create invitations, logotypes, original signatures and other customised designs that involve beautiful letters.